I was boarding a Chiang Mai to Kuala Lumpur flight when I fell into a conversation with a woman behind me. She was Thai and married to a Malaysian. I asked what she thought of KL. She said she didn’t much like it as it was a just a big city like Bangkok. I understood perfectly as Chiang Mai, although it could be busy with traffic snarls and over-building, was not cut off from nature. It is only a short ride to lakes, waterfalls, paddy fields, pristine streams and temples built into caves. Then she said, “I don’t like the toilets. Dirty!”

It was all too true. Why are Malaysian toilets so dirty? It’s not because we sometimes use the bidet spray, for Chiang Mai toilets use them too. The toilets at KLIA can be appalling and a sad welcome for visitors to Malaysia. Why is it kept in such a bad state? Is it all the foreign workers here who can’t use the facilities properly? I doubt it for I recently ventured into a wine bar and found to toilets to be awful and not a foreign worker in sight.

Perhaps with the new government, attitudes might change. We can start making our country better in all aspects. 

It begins with those responsible for the toilets, whether it’s the operator of the mall, airport or shop. Then the users have to respect the facilities. Perhaps awards can be given for the best and worst toilets within a certain vicinity. Anyone like to start handing out these awards?

I’m not the first one to talk about our toilets:

https://thetravelmanuel.com/why-malaysia-has-the-worst-toilets-in-the-world/

https://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/letters/2016/02/22/the-shocking-state-of-our-public-toilets/

http://malaysiandigest.com/features/708295-are-m-sia-s-public-toilets-really-the-worst-in-the-world.html

All operators  need to follow a standard operating procedure (SOP) in maintaining clean toilets and up-lifting Malaysia’s poor image:

https://www.johnston.biz/tips-for-keeping-public-restrooms-clean/

https://www.quora.com/How-do-we-keep-public-toilets-clean

Perhaps regular inspections by the local authorities are needed. Perhaps they should fine those that have unsightly, dirty facilities.

I’m writing this at an upmarket cafe in an office building in Damansara Height. The ceiling above the urinals in the food court below had been demolished which means no downlight and so it was dark. Water pooled on the floor.

I just felt like fleeing from the place . . . and writing this blog.

Well, that’s enough of the toilet talk.

I now need to (sadly) go to the loo!

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